1202

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The Crusaders conquering the city of Zadar (or Zara), by Andrea Vicentino.

Year 1202 (MCCII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

Events

By place

Fourth Crusade

  • April–May – The bulk of the Crusader army gathers at Venice – although with far smaller numbers than expected: about 12,000 men (4–5,000 knights and 8,000 soldiers) instead of 33,500 men. Several contingents decide to make their own way to the Holy Land by different routes. A Crusader fleet sail from Flanders, carrying supplies for the Counts Baldwin IX and his brother Henry of Flanders, winters in Marseilles, but is slowed by adverse weather. Later it sails on to the Middle East, along with other contingents from southern France. [1]
  • Summer – The Crusader army, encamped on the island of San Niccolo di Lido between the Venetian Lagoon and the Adriatic Sea, is threatened by Doge Enrico Dandolo to keep them interned unless full payment is made as agreed (see 1201). As the Crusaders wait on the Lido for men to arrive, they also use up food supplies that Venice has agreed to supply. Dandolo faces a financial catastrophe, who has halted its commerce for a year's time, to prepare the expedition. The Crusader lords can offer Dandolo only 51,000 silver marks.[2]
  • September 8 – Enrico Dandolo takes the cross and agrees to lead a Venetian force, which, in an outburst of Crusading enthusiasm, reaches some 21,000 men – the largest contingent of the Fourth Crusade. He proclaims the debts will be wiped, if the Crusaders take the 'rebel' Dalmatian city of Zadar, who has pledged its loyalty to Emeric, king of Hungary and Croatia. The Zadar proposal causes disquiet in the Crusader ranks – but it upset also Pope Innocent III threatening to excommunicate those who attack Zadar.[3]
  • September – Prince Alexios Angelos sends representatives from Verona to the Crusader leaders in Venice, he promises to submit the Greek Orthodox Church to papal obedience and to provide the Crusade with 200,000 silver marks, together with provisions for a year. Alexios also will contribute 10,000 mounted soldiers to the expedition. In return he wants the Crusade to overthrow his uncle, the Byzantine emperor Alexios III (Angelos).[4]
  • November 1024Siege of Zadar: The Crusaders under Boniface of Montferrat besiege and conquer Zadar in Dalmatia. Despite letters from Innocent III forbidding such an action, and threatening excommunication. The leading citizens of Zadar hang banners of crosses along the outer walls, professing their Catholic faith. Nevertheless, the Crusaders breached and sacked the city, killing many.[5]
  • Winter – Innocent III excommunicates the Crusader army, along with the Venetians, which winters at Zadar. Many Crusaders, including some senior men, either abandon the Fourth Crusade or make their own way to the Holy Land. However, the majority remains in Zadar, where the army receives some welcome reinforcements. During the winter, negotiations continue with Alexios Angelos.[6]

Europe

Middle East

By topic

Literature

Religion

Births

Deaths

References

  1. David Nicolle (2011). Osprey: Campaign - Nr. 237. The Fourth Crusade 1202–04. The betrayal of Byzantium, p. 44. Page Template:Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css has no content.{{#invoke:Catalog lookup link|main}}{{#invoke:check isxn|check_isbn|978-1-84908-319-5|error={{#invoke:Error|error| Parameter error in {{ISBN}}: Invalid ISBN.|tag=span}}}}.
  2. David Nicolle (2011). Osprey: Campaign - Nr. 237. The Fourth Crusade 1202–04. The betrayal of Byzantium, p. 44. Page Template:Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css has no content.{{#invoke:Catalog lookup link|main}}{{#invoke:check isxn|check_isbn|978-1-84908-319-5|error={{#invoke:Error|error| Parameter error in {{ISBN}}: Invalid ISBN.|tag=span}}}}.
  3. David Nicolle (2011). Osprey: Campaign - Nr. 237. The Fourth Crusade 1202–04. The betrayal of Byzantium, p. 45. Page Template:Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css has no content.{{#invoke:Catalog lookup link|main}}{{#invoke:check isxn|check_isbn|978-1-84908-319-5|error={{#invoke:Error|error| Parameter error in {{ISBN}}: Invalid ISBN.|tag=span}}}}.
  4. David Nicolle (2011). Osprey: Campaign - Nr. 237. The Fourth Crusade 1202–04. The betrayal of Byzantium, pp. 45–46. Page Template:Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css has no content.{{#invoke:Catalog lookup link|main}}{{#invoke:check isxn|check_isbn|978-1-84908-319-5|error={{#invoke:Error|error| Parameter error in {{ISBN}}: Invalid ISBN.|tag=span}}}}.
  5. David Nicolle (2011). Osprey: Campaign - Nr. 237. The Fourth Crusade 1202–04. The betrayal of Byzantium, pp. 46–48. Page Template:Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css has no content.{{#invoke:Catalog lookup link|main}}{{#invoke:check isxn|check_isbn|978-1-84908-319-5|error={{#invoke:Error|error| Parameter error in {{ISBN}}: Invalid ISBN.|tag=span}}}}.
  6. David Nicolle (2011). Osprey: Campaign - Nr. 237. The Fourth Crusade 1202–04. The betrayal of Byzantium, p. 48. Page Template:Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css has no content.{{#invoke:Catalog lookup link|main}}{{#invoke:check isxn|check_isbn|978-1-84908-319-5|error={{#invoke:Error|error| Parameter error in {{ISBN}}: Invalid ISBN.|tag=span}}}}.
  7. Bradbury, Jim (2007). The Capetians: Kings of France 987–1328, p. 179. Hambledon Continuum.
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  9. Ivane Javakhishvili (1983). History of the Georgian Nation, p. 249. Tbilisi: Georgia.
  10. Tyerman, Christopher (2006). God's War: A New History of the Crusades, pp. 689–691. Cambridge, Massachusetts: The Belknap Press of Harvard University Press. Page Template:Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css has no content.{{#invoke:Catalog lookup link|main}}{{#invoke:check isxn|check_isbn|0-674-02387-0|error={{#invoke:Error|error| Parameter error in {{ISBN}}: Invalid ISBN.|tag=span}}}}.
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  13. David Nicolle (2011). Osprey: Campaign - Nr. 237. The Fourth Crusade 1202–04. The betrayal of Byzantium, p. 17. Page Template:Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css has no content.{{#invoke:Catalog lookup link|main}}{{#invoke:check isxn|check_isbn|978-1-84908-319-5|error={{#invoke:Error|error| Parameter error in {{ISBN}}: Invalid ISBN.|tag=span}}}}.

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